NASAgovVideo

SOHO Sees Comet ISON Appear

Published on Nov 27, 2013

Comet ISON moves ever closer to the sun in this movie from the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, captured in the early hours of Nov. 27, 2013. A coronal mass ejection explodes off the sun — it is unlikely to damage ISON even if they cross paths.
Credit: ESA/NASA/SOHO
Download this video at http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/….

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STEREO Watches Comet ISON, Nov. 20-25, 2013

Published on Nov 26, 2013

This movie from the spacecraft’s Heliospheric Imager shows Comet ISON, Mercury, Comet Encke andEarth over a five-day period from Nov. 20 to Nov. 25, 2013. The sun sits right of the field of view of this camera. Credit: NASA/STEREO
Download a copy of this video at http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/…

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GPM Takes Off

Published on Nov 26, 2013

An international satellite that will set a new standard for global precipitation measurements from space has completed a 7,300-mile journey from the United States to Japan, where it now will undergo launch preparations. A U.S. Air Force C-5 transport aircraft carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory landed at Kitakyushu Airport, about 600 miles southwest of Tokyo, at approximately 10:30 p.m. EST Saturday, Nov. 23. The spacecraft, the size of a small private jet, is the largest satellite ever built at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. It left Goddard inside a large shipping container Nov. 19 and began its journey across the Pacific Ocean Nov. 21 from Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, with a refueling stop in Anchorage, Alaska. From Kitakyushu Airport, the spacecraft was loaded onto a barge heading to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA’s) Tanegashima Space Center on Tanegashima Island in southern Japan, where it will be prepared for launch in early 2014 on an H-IIA rocket.

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Overview Animation of Gamma-ray Burst

Published on Nov 21, 2013

Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the cosmos. Astronomers think most occur when the core of a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel, collapses under its own weight, and forms a black hole. The black hole then drives jets of particles that drill all the way through the collapsing star at nearly the speed of light. Artist’s rendering.

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a011400/a011407/

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Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

Published on Nov 21, 2013

Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves that result in low-energy (million electron volt, or MeV) gamma rays. As the leading edge of the jet interacts with its environment, it generates an external shock wave that results in the production of high-energy (billion electron volt, or GeV) gamma rays. Artist’s rendering.

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a011400/a011407/

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Asteroid Redirect Mission Concept Animation

Published on Aug 22, 2013

Concept animation featuring notional crew operations during NASA’s proposed Asteroid Redirect Mission

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Temperature Data: 1880-2011

Published on May 22, 2013

Global temperatures have warmed significantly since 1880, the beginning
of what scientists call the “modern record.” At this time, the coverage
provided by weather stations allowed for essentially global temperature
data. As greenhouse gas emissions from energy production, industry and
vehicles have increased, temperatures have climbed, most notably since
the late 1970s. In this animation of temperature data from 1880-2011,
reds indicate temperatures higher than the average during a baseline
period of 1951-1980, while blues indicate lower temperatures than the
baseline average.

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